Gloves for John Alexander Skelton

I’ve been busy this year but a lot of what I’ve been up to has had to be kept under wraps. I was contacted by John Alexander Skelton, a fashion designer based in Sarabande Studios, London, to work with him to make two pairs of gloves based on traditional glove designs and his ideas for his collection launched on March 17th.

The name of the collection is RADICAL NORTH and these words are knitted in to the cuff of one pair.

The second pair has the date of the Peterloo Massacre, 1819, knitted into the gauntlet and a heart on the hand, to be worn on the back of the hand or on the palm.

They are knitted in Jamieson’s double knitting Shetland wool in black and natural white. I was helped in the knitting by my daughter which meant that it was not too much of a scramble  to get them to John by his deadline.

She was able to go to the show at Sarabande Studios which sounded wonderful. The models, who were street cast – that means they were found in cafes and so on, rather than from a model agency. There was no music and the men read from Shelley’s poem ‘The Masque of Anarchy’ as they walked on stage. The last person was a wearing a head dress made from sheeps’ skulls with two candles burning in it.

Here are the gloves – they are big, 12 inches or 30 cms in length.

There are more on John’s Instagram page:

The fringes are a feature found on a very old pair in the Wordsworth Museum, Grasmere

  And here are the pictures from the show:

 

 

I am part of an afternoon of talks

I’ll be at Ruthin Craft Centre tomorrow afternoon as part of their afternoon looking at ‘The Nature of Craft’. Also speaking are Edmond Byrne, glass and Sebastian Cox, furniture.

This is the link to the Ruthin web site which includes an image of my gloves:

http://www.canolfangrefftrhuthun.org.uk/be-sy-mlaen/oriel-1-2-3/ (in Welsh)

http://ruthincraftcentre.org.uk/whats-on/gallery-1-2-3/ (in English)

The previous talk I was planning, in London a fortnight ago, was cancelled, or actually, postponed. It will be rescheduled for June I hope.

I’m giving a talk!

Just thought I’d let you all know that I’ll be giving a talk in London on Saturday 18th March 2017 at 1pm. It’s a Central London Branch Meeting of the Knitting & Crochet Guild with speaker Angharad Thomas (that’s me!)
AAT, 4th Floor, 140 Aldersgate St, London EC1A 4HY

The title of the talk is Gloves: History, designing and making and I’ll show examples of my own and some made by others too – historic and from other countries.

Contact me via this blog or if you are a KCG member you can contact Tricia Basham to book a ticket – £5 members and £10 non-members.

After I gave an introductory talk for my glove exhibition people were very complimentary – so it is highly recommended! (That’s enough self promotion, Ed.)

Exhibition ends soon

Happy New Year!

My exhibition at the Bankfield Museum ends this Saturday, 14th January. It’s open all week from tomorrow to Saturday 10 am – 4 pm so I do hope that you can get there to have a look if you haven’t been already. There’s lots of other interesting exhibitions on there too.

Here’s some pictures if you can’t get there:

 

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Hand in Glove exhibition

Last Saturday, 12th November, the exhibition of my gloves opened at the Bankfield Museum, Halifax, West Yorkshire. It is on until Saturday 14th January 2017. The Bankfield is open 10am – 4pm Tuesday  – Saturday but it will be closed over Christmas and the New Year.

It was great fun setting up and preparing. The curator, Angela Clare provided me with large fabric panels for the gloves (pinned on) which went into frames and I had 5 glass cases to fill with contextual material. In these are items on loan from the Collection of the Knitting & Crochet Guild where I volunteer, sketchbooks and design work, and items that I’ve designed for magazines. There are five information panels and two frames of vintage glove patterns. There’s also a frame with ball bands from some of the yarns I’ve used over the years. Most of it was planned weeks before so that I could be sure that there was enough material for the space. I used A1 boards and laid out the gloves and items for the cases at home ages ago so I knew that there was sufficient material.

I gave a talk to open the exhibition, just so that people could find out more about why I have knitted all these gloves and some of the research work behind them. I had notified the Huddersfield Examiner   who ran a piece about the exhibition about 10 days ago, and I also had an interview on Radio Leeds. I had Tweeted a bit too, but on the day there were 30 chairs in the hall and about 80 people! Lots more chairs were found so only a few people had to stand. So thank you, print and broadcast media, and social media for getting so many people there. It was very exciting and everyone seemed to enjoy themselves.

Here are some pictures:

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The first case with a variety of Sanquhar gloves: 2 pairs from the KCG Collection and one from the Bankfield Collection

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The Yorkshire case: gloves from the KCG Collection, with a first edition of the Old Hand knitter of the Dales, and knitting sticks from the KCG Collection.

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  I’m the one at the front, wearing a white poppy for peace

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With Angela Clare, from the Bankfield. She’s really lots taller than me!

Barbara, my fellow volunteer at the KCG has blogged about the exhibition here: and her blogs are always worth a read.

Knit for Peace

I’ve been experimenting with knitting gloves or mittens to send to an amazing organisation called Knit for Peace. Based in London they both bring people together to knit and understand each other better, but also collect garments and other things that are then sent out to people in need of them, in Syria, mainly.

So as a break from knitting fine gloves, I decided to make some simpler gloves and mittens for Knit for Peace, with the aim of designing a pattern for them; more on that later.  This I saw as an opportunity to explore some different structures for covering the hands, with a view to perhaps using them in my own designs, so not entirely philanthropic in aim! I started with their own patterns for hand warmers which are a garter stitch square that has a gap in the side seam for the thumb. Very straight forward.

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Waiting to be sewn up

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Ready to wear

These are knitted in 2 strands of vintage pure wool Jaeger 4ply which should be nice and warm, and which came from the Knitting & Crochet Guild Convention stash swap. I’ve got another pair on the needles and it’s great to have something straightforward to knit as a change from complicated gloves!

So far I have also knitted 2 mittens from Elizabeth Zimmermann, the 36 stitch pattern from Knitters Almanac, and the garter stitch mitts from Knitting Around. These are in the same vintage pure wool as the hand warmers. You can see these below, and although the 36 stitch mitts look rather long and thin they are actually fine once they are on a hand – like mine!

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EZ 36 stitch mitts

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EZ sideways garter stitch mitts

The sideways garter stitch mitts are interesting to knit, and cunningly constructed but I don’t think they are one of EZ’s most inspired creations – however, I’m still glad that I tried them.

I offered to write a pattern for mittens and perhaps gloves for Knit for Peace and apparently most of their contributors like to knit on 2 needles from patterns that they provide, not Ravelry or the internet. So, I started knitting some mittens on two needles, and I’m almost there with the pattern having realised that you have to knit the thumb before progressing up the hand. I struggled with this, having knitted a whole mitten and gone back to the thumb in the round with a pair of straight pins. It didn’t work. I then had to find a pattern for mittens on two needles, which is not as easy as you might think, to see how it’s done. I found a Canadian booklet for gloves and mitts which explained the process, so now I can progress with my pattern.

So that’s all for now about Knit for Peace, but I plan to be writing more soon.

Knitting in California

It’s time I caught up on what I’ve been doing lately, which is mainly being in California for two weeks. Although it’s very warm there a lot of the time I was still able to fit in some knitting activity. However, I have to admit that I did not do a single stitch of knitting, not even on two long haul flights. In fact, I even almost left my knitting bag behind under my seat on the flight home. But luckily I had a dig around the debris of the flight and found it there.

A while ago June Hemmons Hiatt, author of the Principles of Knitting, was in the UK and we planned to meet up, having met at the inaugural Center for Knit and Crochet conference in 2102. That didn’t happen for various reasons so when I found out that June lives quite near where I go to visit my step daughter we agreed to meet. For those of you who are familiar with Principles of Knitting you’ll know that June is a total expert on knitting. Her book covers everything from how to actually make the stitches to all aspects of planning a project.

June is also working on producing knitting belts which are available from her web site. They are all top quality leather and hand made, so a real work of art and craft. Plus, using a knitting belt is a great way to knit.

So as well as having lunch, we talked a great deal of knitting ‘shop talk’, fairs and events. June was due to go to the New York State Sheep and Wool Festival in Rhinebeck, October 15th and 16th, so just coming up now, techniques, needles, and all sorts of textile-ly things.

Here’s June and I having had lunch:

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Then June introduced me to a unique shop and gallery called Lacis which has haberdashery, tools, books, textiles and costume. It really is amazing, and if I wasn’t used to seeing huge quantities of old and vintage textiles in the Knitting & Crochet Guild Collection, where I volunteer, I would have been even more amazed that I was. I have never seen such a selection of thread, needles, gadgets, patterns, pins, ever. And that’s including John Lewis haberdashery in its heyday and Duttons for Buttons and all those wonderful places down side streets in London ….

When I’d recovered from that, at least a week or ten days later, I went to visit A Verb for Keeping Warm, a shop and centre for all sorts of textile activities in Oakland, so about 30 minutes away from where I was staying and not so far from Lacis. If you have a look at the web site you get a sense of the place and what they do there. Have a look at the pictures of the outdoor space at the back of the shop – it is quite special. I asked if my partner could sit here while I browsed and it was fine. We were both happy.

Here’s some pictures:

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Natural dyed yarn and dried marigoldsfor dyeing with in the outdoor space

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Verb has knitting and spinning and dressmaking/quilting supplies so there was a lot to look at and all of it beautiful – lovely things, well presented, plus some that I hadn’t seen before, like this magazine from Canada, Uppercase. I bought this edition, more or less for the image on the front cover, which looks like a patchwork quilt, but made of pieces of painted wood from salvaged houses. You can see more of them at the artist’s web site.

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I also bought a copy of the natural dyeing book, written by the Verb’s owner, Kristine Vejar. A clever move, calling it The Modern Natural Dyer, as I have several books on natural dyeing, and have done some natural dyeing, but I obviously need an update. I left this in California with my daughter. I’ll get it back next time I visit if she hasn’t used it by then.

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And the last couple of things I bought (remember, I never buy yarn, and I don’t buy books when I’m abroad as they are too heavy to carry home) was a skein of Brooklyn Tweed yarn in a sludgy green that is my favourite colour more or less, and a Brooklyn Tweed book. I look at BT books on line and they are wonderful – beautifully produced and photographed and this one is no exception. It will probably be a present, as I really do not need another knitting book. I even forgive the incorrect spelling of Woolens. Joke.

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And finally, I bought some Blue Faced Leicester tops in Verb, as the spinning wheel was out at my daughter’s house. I took the wheel over there after my mother died, over ten years ago, literally in a box, held onto wheels with some bungies. It travelled as checked in baggage. Anyway, the white tops were quite ok to spin with, although not a nice as some grey Gotland which had come from the local knitting shop in Lafayette. Here’s me spinning on a Hebridean wheel in California:

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And that’s all for now. Thanks for reading if you got this far.