June newsletter – moths and collecting

The big news is that I have found clothes moths in the house. The warm weather brought out a lot of moths of all sorts and so I renewed my sticky moth traps and found that I caught three small clothes moths almost immediately. Here they are:

So then I decided that I should turn out the places where I store wool and woolly things which turns out to be more than I’d bargained for. There are garments – current and old, yarn in stash, yarn in ongoing knitting, cashmere, alpaca and wool tops for spinning, and wool blankets – knitted, crocheted and woven, Not to mention a couple of suits and jackets.

First to get opened up was a trunk full of old garments that I keep, a personal archive. There’s a mixture from things I made years ago to things I bought and have never worn to outfits from Trent Polytechnic back in the 1980 s.

Here are some of them:

This is an Orenburg shawl, brought back for me from the USSR as it then was by a friend who’s a research physicist, so he know lots of Russians and used to go there quite a lot. It was bought in St Petersburg and is now at the dry cleaner’s.

A Shetland scarf, bought there on a visit in the 1992. Also at the dry cleaner’s right now.

A rather nice hat, hand knitted. The label inside says it’s from Lithuania but I’m not sure how I came by it … it has been hand washed.

A Shetland tam, bought there.

Hand spun and hand knitted by me, Jacob’s wool scarf, a long time ago

Ethnic socks, think they might have come from Nepal when I visited in 1995

A cotton bag to put handkerchiefs in, hand knitted in Zimbabwe and brought back by me in the 1990s.

The Urban Jumper. My design, machine knitted in glorious synthetics. Worn by my partner in the 1980s

My hand knitting, inspired by the Danish book, Everybody’s Knitting. 

It started out life as a dress, and ended up as a skirt and top for my daughter aged about 7 at the time. All wool was unravelled from other garments bought in charity shops.

A cardigan designed and knitted by a Japanese company from when I worked with Japanese knitwear producers.

My sweater drawer has been taken wholesale to the dry cleaner who are giving me a good discount on bulk, including lace items that I really don’t want to have to block and quite a lot of cashmere.

The yarn has gone into the freezer for a while. Information on the web varies on the length of time things should stay there, from 2 days (Vogue magazine UK) to a week. I have been told 3 weeks so who knows what the correct time is? (If you think you know, please tell me pronto!).

Other items have been handwashed and are now ready to go back in the trunk, all sprayed inside with moth killer spray and new newspaper.

And then of course, there’s the big question – why keep most of this stuff at all?

 

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “June newsletter – moths and collecting

  1. Angharad, you should keep and wear the lovely Orenburg scarf and the nice shetland tam, no discussion ;=)

    And: don’t forget to take your things out of the freezer before you leave to Estonia ;=)

    Cheers, Connie

    Like

    • Connie, you are correct – I will give the tam to my daughter this weekend. And yes, what a good idea to wear the Orenburg shawl! So looking forward to seeing you in Estonia!

      Like

  2. I keep things in tubs but still am in fear that bugs might get in. I gave a pair of perfect fit/hand knit gloves from Estonia that I hardly ever wear because I am afraid something will happen to them – oh well
    but good you have a good dry cleaner you can trust! I have lots of linen embroidered towels from Russia and the Ukraine rolled up in tissue paper – I think we just like looking at these things sigh although I have passed on most fancy tablecloths. Maryjo

    Like

  3. I *keep* my wool/silk yarn in the freezer. It hasn’t come to any harm yet, other than a slight musty smell that clears within an hour or so. Occasionally I get it out, choose one for knitting and air the remainder, but most of the time it’s filling unused space in a completely moth-free environment. There might be shawl or two there as well.

    Like

Leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s