A beautiful garment

Happy New Year!

I have many resolutions for 2016, one of them being to extol the virtues of machine knitting wherever possible. Over the New Year an old friend of mine appeared wearing a very lovely dark navy blue sweater with a roll neck. It was beautifully made and proportioned, and machine knitted in fine dense pure wool. It was perfect for the occasion where we were part of a group of friends staying high in the Lake District at Honister Hause Youth Hostel. We were at 1100 feet and not that far below the snow line so good functional warm clothes were essential even inside, especially when we first arrived.

Earlier today I had the chance to look at this garment in detail and find out where it had come from. In the past, I have knitted garments for him and also given him small knitted gifts like the small throw that I blogged about some while ago (I had trouble finding it, might reorganise in the next few days) and he is also the recipient of a pair of my hand knitted gloves. In short, I am confident that he has good taste in knitwear. I was curious about this latest model but he does sail and so I knew that he would know places to buy proper gear. It turned out that he just did a ‘heavy duty google’ for fisherman’s jumpers and this was what appeared.

I had a good look at it this morning and took some pictures of the fabric and the structure and also the label. It is made by a Danish firm that I have not come across before called SNS Herning. The web site shows their range of garments which is extensive for men, but rather limited for women. It is obvious from the site that they are pitching at a fashion market as well as to those who want functional clothing and the stockists in London are in key locations such as Redchurch Street, home to Labour and Wait, one of my favourite shops and Lambs Conduit Street, another place for great small shops.

The web site tells of the machines on which the garments are knitted and also a bit about the people who knit them and in many ways the set up is similar to that of small scale weavers such as Melin Tregwynt and Solva Woollen Mill, both in West Wales, who batch produce high quality goods using mechanised looms but hand finishing processes. Interestingly, the SNS Herning sweater label said that it was knitted in Denmark and made up in Latvia, presumably to keep costs down but it could also be to do with access to machinery or people with particuar skills.

So here’s the pictures I took:

IMG_20160103_100928

The rather wonderful retro back neck label

IMG_20160103_101044The sleeve and shoulder

 

 

Detail of hem finish

A rather dark shot of the hem

The fabric is constructed from a dense double jersey (the plain sections) interspersed with bands of a textured stitch, for you machine knitters a tuck stitch, which adds both elasticity and a textural interest. The garment is put together with a heavy overlock, often associated with cheaper quality knitwear but I was impressed by the superb quality of this manufacture which is really solid and immaculately done.

 

And check the label! The whole thing a great advert for machine produced knitwear.

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4 thoughts on “A beautiful garment

  1. Dear Angharad,
    a merry happy New Year to you as well!
    I read this article on the danish gansey with interest as I tried to find out whether there are any german fisherman ganseys (nobody until now found some…)

    Are you coming to Craft Camp this year? I am planning a small estonian tour after the Camp and I am looking for friends to join….

    have a nice, snowy, winterly week to wear gloves!

    Connie

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    • Connie, good to hear from you! Yes I’m thinking about Estonia too but haven’t made any decisions yet.
      It would be interesting to look for fishing or sailors sweaters on the north German coast perhaps?

      Angharad

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      • Angharad, there was a search for those sweaters, initiated by the “Historic Knitting”-forum in Ravelry, without any result.
        It is strange, there are such ganseys in the Netherlands, in Danmark, in the Baltics, but none in Germany… that’s what I think: we germans have a very poor knitting history and tradition…

        I am just studying Muhu patterns, what a richness ;=)

        Connie

        Like

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